What Is The Most Common Circular Saw Blade Size?

What is the most common circular blade size?

If you are a newbie in the DIY revolution and are looking to purchase a circular saw, you might soon find yourself overwhelmed by the sheer amount of information on the internet.

That is why; here I have compiled all the information you will need about circular saws, blades, and blade sizes including the most common sizes.

I hope that you will find here all the information you will need to get started.

What is The Best Circular Saw Blade Size?

Saw blade sizes are measured by diameter. They can range from 5 – 12 inches for various applications and are normally determined by the type and size of material you will be cutting.

Cordless saws tend to be smaller in sizes and require some of the smaller blade sizes.

Most saws are corded and are made for general usage and take the 7 ¼ inch blade. This is the best size not only for beginners but also for experienced people.

The 7 ¼ inch saw blade has a maximum cutting depth of just over 3 inches at 450 cutting angle. But this can be adjusted for thinner materials by the use of its shoe plate.

It can be adjusted for bezel cuts, but this in turn decreases the cutting depth. The 7 ¼ inch saw also has the widest range of blade types available for different cutting applications.

This makes it ideal for DIY’ers because you can switch blades at will. It helps you to cut through different materials without having to purchase a different saw each time.

For a guide on purchasing circular blades, you can also check our article on best circular saw blades which has a detailed circular saw buying guide at the end.

Circular Saw Blade Size Chart

There is a wide range of circular saw sizes available in the market. It depends majorly on the desired depth of cut.

Below I have compiled a chart of the sizes available and the purpose of such blades. An important consideration is the number of teeth available per blade.

More teeth per blade of a similar size make for cleaner cuts but at less speed. For rough work and for faster cutting, fewer teeth are highly recommended.

For cutting wood:

Blade Size in Inches

Number of Teeth available

Purpose

5 ¾”

18, 24

Ripping and framing

5 ½”

18, 24

Ripping and framing

6 ½”

18, 24

Ripping and framing

 

40

Trimming, finishing

7 ¼”

16, 18, 24 

Framing and ripping

 

24

Decks

 

40, 60

Finishing and trimming

8”, 8 ¼”

24

General purpose

 

40

Trimming and finishing

10”

24

Framing

 

40

Decks

 

60, 80

Trimming/finishing

12”

40

General purpose

 

72

Trimming and finishing

 

80, 100

Fine trimming and finishing

For metal, ceramics and other applications:

Blade Size in Inches

Number of Blade Teeth

Purpose

5 ¾”

20

Steel

6 ¾”

40

Steel

7”

36

Steel

7¼”

48, 68

Steel, including thin steel

 

120

Vinyl siding

10”

4

Fiber, cement

 

80

Thin steel

12”

6

Fiber, cement

 

60, 80

Steel

12”

8

Fiber, cement

More information can be found at Irwin guide, one of the best-known companies that make circular saw blades.

This information can also be used for models from other manufacturers.

What Should be an Ideal Circular Saw Blade Thickness?

Saw blade thickness is usually referred to as the ‘kerf’ of the blade and is measured in thousandths of an inch.

Heavy-duty blades can go to 0.172 of an inch, while the thin kerf blades typically measure up to 25% less kerf at about 0.091”. The thinnest blades will be found at 0.059”.

Thin kerf blades rotate and cut faster but are more prone to warping. Thicker ones will need more power to turn and produce more waste material but will be more durable.

Most people prefer thin kerf blades as they are more economical in the long run and can be mounted on almost any saw.

More information is available at this page on blades, CircularBlades.net.

Can I Put Smaller Blade on My Circular Saw?

Yes. You can fit a smaller diameter blade on almost any saw, but it is not recommended.

A smaller blade will cut less material with each revolution and rotate at a higher RPM.

While most circular saws will accept smaller blade sizes, you’re better off just using the recommended blade size. Instead of varying the number of teeth or type of blade, you can use these smaller blades for specialty jobs.

Can I Use a Bigger Blade on My Circular Saw?

Most saws will not accept a larger blade size and will jam up on use. Those that do; will have their arbor strained due to the added weight.

The saw will also be underpowered and will perform poorly. As mentioned above, use the maximum recommended blade size for the saw for safety purposes.

Conclusion

When buying the blade, first consider the saw that you will be using. There has to be perfect harmony between the two for the safest and the best working experience.

The blade spins backwards and up through the material when cutting.

It is thus important to fit the blade accordingly. And every blade has appropriate markings to show the direction of the spin.

Finally, make sure that your body is on the side of the saw and not to the back. Plus, it is important to ensure you’re wearing appropriate protective clothing.

 

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